Tag Archive | gardening in Maine

End of the Month View: July

Since it’s not yet time for the End of the  Month View for August, I figured I’m still somewhat timely for the July View.

July is a time of deep heat and fullness. The corn towers over our heads and the tassels are showing!  There are two gigantic sunflowers reaching towards the sky. It must be the fertility of the chicken coop that stood there for so many years. 

The blue barrel holds the comfrey nettle kelp compost tea. The plants drink it up and keep on growing! The nettles are getting their second growth.  Nettle is a super compost ingredient. Each cutting gets layered into the compost heap. 

Hollyhocks abound! I counted five different colors.  Honey bees and hummingbirds visit frequently.  It gives me great joy to hear and see the bees buzzing around the blossoms.  

Zinnias are Harry’s favorite garden flower. Their vibrant colors and perky petals are a mainstay in the bouquets he brings to me.  It’s hard to be “uncheerful”  looking at zinnias..

My flower garden is in the second growth now. Daffodils and Sweet William have gone and the Painted Daisy, Crazy Daisy and Shasta Daisy are putting out their bloom stalks.  Snapdragon, cosmos, marigold and more zinnia transplants form a sweet curve in the garden entrance.

Echinacea is setting its first blossoms. I love their hardy strength and seed head. Most of all, we depend on the roots to make medicine tea for winter colds. 

It’s time to thin and trim the calendula next to the strawberries.  It will bloom again through the autumn if we get the midsummer deadheading done.  The whole row was a self seeding gift.  The calendula petals can be infused in oil and used to heal wounds and skin.  Your fingers may get sticky with calendula flower juice as you pluck them!

Fresh garden food right now includes broccoli, Costata Romenesca zucchini, Ailsa Craig onions, cucumbers, beets, chard, carrots and green beans. Often our supper is a giant pot of vegetables fresh from the garden.  The taste of vegetables unadorned in full fresh flavor is a seasonal headiness that passes so quickly. 

Preserving season is ramping up as well.  I’ve made cherry jelly from my garden buddy Andy’s cherries and a combination jam with raspberries from our daughters garden and blueberries Harry and I picked in the western Maine mountains. My hope is to have canned beans, tomatoes and carrots going into the winter. 

This week is garlic pulling week. The garlic looks beautiful!  We grow Music Pink and a braiding variety.  We used our last garlic off the braid about two weeks ago.

I’ve been away from our garden since early August. My dad lives far away on the Oregon coast. I got a call and learned that his heart has failed and may stop at any time now.  So I left the garden and flew out to sit with my dad, hold his hand and sing him songs one last time before he makes his final flight to freefall into the pure light. 

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Tuesday View 5.9.17

It’s been a cold rainy week in The Hill. The fields and trees are taking a cool deep drink of water. It was a chilly 40 degrees F this morning, but blue sky and sunlight called me down to the Memorial Garden for my Tuesday View.

There is not a lot of dramatic change this week. I worked on landscaping, shaping and extracting rhizomial grasses.  The garden is heart shaped with two smaller interior hearts. It’s a whole lotta love


Let’s “dig, dig, dig a little deeper” and see what is new this week. If you look close the heart shape becomes apparent. Tex’s rose and my unknown vibrant green clump look great!  I’ve used coco coir as an amendment.  


There are three lilac bushes. I cut this whole one back severely to bring out the strong new branches. 


This lilac bush was pruned more moderately.  I left most of the bottom growth alone. 


I’ve left this bush alone to see what it will do. It’s really scraggly but majestic in its own way though.


The lupine is vibrant and looks very happy.  I planted Majestic Giant pansies around it. 

Digging around through the sod filled areas I found this perennial plant.  I’m not sure what it is, I suspect echinacea.  Time will tell. 


Any ideas about this plant? It will be easier to identify once it sets flowers.  Curiouser and curiouser…


The real work of the week in the Memorial Garden.  Hours of digging, sifting and teasing out these roots.  If I don’t do the work now, it will be near impossible as the soil settles in.  I know I didn’t get them all, but I did slow them down some.


My roots go down, down to the Earth.

The Tuesday View is a weekly snapshot of the same place in the garden.  Garden bloggers from all over share their “meme” at the Words and Herbs blog. It’s a place for “all who appreciate the beauty of words, flowers and homecooking.”